Miscarriage, D & C scheduled, doctor suggests WLS

A reader writes:

First I want to say thank you so much for this blog. It makes me angry, but it also helps me feel understood.

I have always been fat. I was a fat child, a fat teenager, and now am a fat adult.

When my husband and I decided to try to have a baby, we discovered that I had a fertility issue (unrelated to my weight) that would prevent any sort of natural conception. Fast forward six years to our second IVF try and we were ecstatic that it worked. Until week 10 when I went in for my first scan and they found that the baby did not have a heartbeat. We were crushed. We decided that I would go off all medication that was supporting the pregnancy and wait for my body to spontaneously abort.

Unfortunately a week later, I ended up in the emergency room, bleeding heavily and in a significant amount of pain. I will say that I in all of these situations, my fertility doctor, the OB who did the first scan, and the ER staff & doctors, all of them treated me with respect and compassion. After receiving some pain medication, I opted to come back the next day for a D&C, considered a same-day surgery.

Here is where my story turns so awful. Because of my husband’s work duties, he was unable to accompany me to the surgery wing the next morning, although he was able to be there before I actually went into surgery and for my recovery. I waited alone for my file to get processed, for the nurse to take my blood pressure and temperature and finally I sat and waited for the anesthesiologist.

I got called back by Dr. H and walked back to sit at his desk. He ignored my medical history (which showed no prior problems with anesthesia at my weight) and began to detail all of the complications that can happen under anesthesia at my weight. Fine. Whatever. I was in a haze and pretty much ignored him unless I was asked a direct question.

But then he looked me in the eye and said, “You know, we have a really excellent bariatric surgery program here. You should think about doing it. You can always get pregnant again later. Your knees will thank you if you do it. I know you’re fine now, but that much extra weight will have a lot of repercussions later on.”

I sat there, stunned. And shamed. And to this day, thinking about it makes me cry. I said nothing in my own defense.

Later as I was laying in pre-op, a chaplain came by and prayed with me. Then he just stood and talked to me for awhile. Out of nowhere, Dr. H comes up to my bedside to check in before surgery. He looks across the bed at the chaplain and says, “I’ve been trying to talk her into doing our bariatric surgery program.”

Did I mention that pre-op is just a bunch of curtained off areas?

Thank God for the chaplain who glared at Dr. H until he left and then just stood with me and held my hand. The shame I felt was indescribable. I was already blaming myself and my body and my weight for being the reason that my baby was gone.

I didn’t tell anyone about what Dr. H said. I didn’t write an angry letter to the hospital. I tried to forget it, but even though that was almost 3 years ago, I remember every second of the horror that I felt. The way that my shame almost choked me.

You don’t have to post my story on your blog, but I felt that this was the time and place to share what happened. Maybe I will go ahead and write that letter telling the hospital how I was treated. I’m fairly new to the Fat Acceptance blog world and it’s going to take me some time to change the way my mind works. I’m hopeful that I can work to put that shame behind me and stop blaming myself for what happened.

Thanks for the venue and for reading this far.

Advertisements

Which hospitals in your network can handle patients of size? Response – Lose some weight.

A reader writes:

Hey… just wanted to share this response from the Cleveland Clinic when I asked what hospitals in their network would be best equipped to handle a person of my size. “Lose some weight, fatty” is less than helpful.

Requestor message : As a person weighing almost 500 pounds, I have found that I’ve been unable to have certain diagnostic tests at certain hospitals. I would like to have more information about what hospitals in the Cleveland Clinic network are best equipped to handle a patient of my size and weight, should I ever be in a situation where I can choose which hospital to go to. Which hospitals have higher weight capacities on their MRI and CT machines, for example? Thank you!

Dear [redacted]:

Thank you for contacting Cleveland Clinic through our website.

It sounds like you have experienced some frustrating situations in getting tests done and the weight issue. Your question is not a black and white response. There are certain weight limits on many of the machines and many times it is a matter of losing 10-50 pounds when one is around 500 pounds. I have a resource for you. We have a website: https://weightloss.clevelandclinic.org/index.aspx

The phone number here is 1-800-339-8929

Congratulations on taking care of yourself and my best to you as you continue on! Please let us know if there is anything else we can do for you!

Sincerely,
Ann M. Biery RN BSN
WebMail Representative
Cleveland Clinic
http://www.clevelandclinic.org/